Through a glass darkly: a nightmare

Through a glass darkly: a nightmareI have a recurring dream in which I’m trying to reach my mother, who in real life has been dead for half a decade. The dream varies somewhat, but one ongoing theme is that I’m stranded in some strange and unpleasant place.

I’m usually attempting to contact her on a cell phone, but (as often happens in dreams) I’m unable to do the simplest things. For instance, I can’t for the life of me remember her number, or find it in my phone, or punch the right digits on the tiny keypad with my fumbling fingers. And all the while I’m aware that I’m not supposed to be calling her, that there are people nearby, shifting faceless figures, who would prevent me from doing so, if they knew. Because they don’t want me to leave that lost and lonely place in which I’m trapped. Continue reading

Horror: the most misunderstood genre

Horror: the most misunderstood genreCome a little closer, and I’ll tell you a dark secret. It’s about horror—not what you think, but maybe what you feel.

Horror. The most misunderstood, looked-down-the-nose-upon genre out there. The red-headed stepchild.

But here’s the thing: good horror can actually be quite literary. Because it goes further. It’s more emotional, more visceral than other genres. It explores the nooks and crannies of the human psyche. It’s intellectual. Horror isn’t just about the monster in the closet, or the thing under the bed. It’s about people’s deep fears, the things they never say out loud, and many times the things they won’t even admit to themselves.

Real life, in other words. Continue reading

Dreaming At the Top of My Lungs available in print

7123802Dreaming At the Top of My Lungs is here, in the flesh. Well…not actually. That’s the next book.

It feels great to have it finally finished, and I’m already on to the next project, which I’m pretty excited about. I’ll keep you up to speed as it progresses.

So go. Get the book. Read it. Then, if you’d be so kind, leave a review on Amazon. It’ll help me keep my dog in kibble. I thank you and so does he.

That’s it for now. Short and sweet. But I’ll be seeing you. Late some night soon. Watching over you in the dark as you sleep.

And making sure that the thing under your bed doesn’t crawl out.

Ten tales of horror from the mind of Israel Finn

-A man who is faced with the prospect of losing the most important thing in his life—his son—but instead loses his mind. And then finds himself trapped in a waking nightmare with no way out.

-A frustrated man who curses life for having the audacity to pass him by, but discovers how it feels to be truly forsaken when the universe chooses to teach him a horrifying lesson.

-An outcast who must decide between vengeance and forgiveness in a world turned upside down by war and famine.

-A woman on trial in a world where telling the truth is a crime.

-A man who is living with a very odd houseguest, a visitor who has no concept of war.

-A boy who lives in constant terror of someone who is supposed to love and protect him, but who has betrayed that trust. A horror story that examines the real-life beasts who walk among us every day.

…And more.

 

 

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

A review of Sour Candy by Kealan Patrick Burke

27687495At first glance, Phil Pendleton and his son Adam are just an ordinary father and son, no different from any other. They take walks in the park together, visit county fairs, museums, and zoos, and eat together overlooking the lake. Some might say the father is a little too accommodating given the lack of discipline when the child loses his temper in public. Some might say he spoils his son by allowing him to eat candy whenever he wants and set his own bedtimes. Some might say that such leniency is starting to take its toll on the father, given how his health has declined.

What no one knows is that Phil is a prisoner, and that up until a few weeks ago and a chance encounter at a grocery store, he had never seen the child before in his life.

I first became aware of the novella Sour Candy through an Amazon promotion via email. The above blurb intrigued me, so I downloaded the sample to my Kindle. When I reached the end of that sample I bought the book without hesitation, because by then I was hooked.

This is psychological horror at its best, intense and mind-blowing. The protagonist, Phil Pendleton, suddenly finds himself in an alternate reality, a distorted funhouse mirror world of which he alone is aware, and from which there is absolutely no escape.

There’s a nightmarish quality about this story that I loved. It had the fascinating and creepy feel of an old Twilight Zone episode, of which I’m a huge fan. Not to mention, the nod to the otherworldliness of H.P. Lovecraft. Sour Candy is straight-up, spine-tingling horror. Dark and gripping, and a story that will stay with you long after you put the book down.

Get it now. Thank me later.

 

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Why I love the strange and unusual

Why I love the strange and unusualI can’t recall not always liking weird shit.

I also can’t really remember my parents being married, although they were, once upon a time. But they divorced right around the time I graduated diapers. Living with my dad and stepmom was tense, to say the least. Why I stayed as long as I did is a story for another time.

There wasn’t much chance for R&R on the old homestead, except according to schedules handed down to my stepbrother, David, and me: after chores—consisting mostly of tending our farm animals—before he and I left for school in the morning, then again when we arrived home in the afternoon, and once more between dinner dishes (though we called the evening meal “supper” in Indiana) being washed, dried, and put away, and tending to the animals yet again at night. And on the weekends, after the delightful job of shoveling shit out of the rabbit hutch, mowing the lawn (in the summer), and helping either my dad or my stepmom, Rose, with some new project or another. But I digress. Continue reading